Digital Media students tour news studio.

Digital Media students tour news studio.

Transfer Plans?

To address the growing academic needs of our students, the Digital Media department of Polk State College now offers additional transfer options for students. Be sure to consult with Polk State advisers and or the advisers of the university to which you intend to transfer to get the most accurate advice because requirements change frequently.

AA Degree with Digital Media Electives for Transfer

If you plan to transfer to a four-year college or university, we recommend enrolling in Polk State’s AA degree. The AA degree in Liberal Arts requires you to earn 36 credit hours (about 12 courses) in General Education and 24 credit hours (about eight courses) in electives for a total of 60 credits that will transfer to any state university in Florida.

Since August 2017, you are able to enroll in digital media courses for your eight elective course options. Please review our digital media course offerings here.

Additionally,  we recommend enrolling in the following digital media courses for your AA electives (click each course for details):

ART 1201C – Design I

Course Description

This course is the basis for all other art courses. In this course, students explore various methods, materials, and art media. Emphasis is placed on the elements and principles of two-dimensional design.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply design principles and theories to the basic concepts of producing a two-dimensional visual image
  2. Apply color theory principles to the basic concepts of producing a two-dimensional image

Course Content

The course projects will develop an understanding of the following topics in pencil, watercolor, acrylic and cut paper media:

  • Line and Shape
  • Relationship between the Positive and Negative
  • Use of Contrast, Value and Color

CGS 2820C – Web Development Fundamentals

Course Description

This course explores key skills required to plan, develop, code and publish well designed and secure websites. Students use HTML, CSS, scripting languages and web development tools to create, edit, and publish web pages and complete web sites. Students are introduced to Internet terminologies, web concepts, programming and coding practices, data transmission protocols, browser software, HTML documents and related concepts. Additionally, students learn to troubleshoot, edit, and enhance web pages using workflows and coding techniques that conform to industry standards for good web design. Participants also use text, images, multimedia and page design principles to enhance the usability and visual appeal of web sites to reflect current trends and aesthetics in web development.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe common terms, concepts, protocols and standards for the Internet, World Wide Web, Web pages, and Web development
  2. Create web documents using appropriate markup languages
  3. Use text, images, links, audio, video, animation and other multimedia on a website in an visually pleasing manner that conform to existing web standards
  4. Employ accessibility principles across a web site in a manner that conforms to industry standards for access
  5. Use HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, JQuery and other markup and scripting languages to create a website using good layout techniques
  6. Incorporate tables, forms, and a database in a new or existing web site
  7. Describe the process for locating a good web host and registering a domain name for a website
  8. Create and test a website for navigation ease, accessibility, target audience appeal, use of a site map, good search features, and other essential elements of a modern web site
  9. Launch and maintain a website
  10. Incorporate responsive designs in web projects
  11. Demonstrate good SEO techniques to increase traffic to a website and increase placement on search engines

Course Content

  • History of Internet, Internet, Intranets, Extranets
  • World Wide Web, Standards and WWW Consortium
  • Accessibility and the Web
  • Ethical use of information on the Web
  • Networks, Client/Server Model
  • FTP, Email, HTTP, TCP/IP; URIs, URLs, Domain Names
  • Markup languages: HTML, CSS
  • Web page: document type, body, heading, paragraph, line break, block quote
  • Lists: Definition, ordered, unordered
  • Text Formatting
  • Hyperlinks: anchor, absolute and relative links, email links, accessibility
  • Validation for HTML, color and text with CSS; syntax
  • Class and ID Selectors; DIV, Span; external style sheets
  • Visual elements and graphics: GIF, JPEG, PNG, background images
  • Page layout and visual appeal; Page layout with CSS
  • Image maps, thumbnails, image slicing, image sources
  • Web Design: organization, hierarchy, navigation, TOC, site map, search
  • Design principles: repetition, contrast, proximity, alignment
  • Load time, web page real estate, white space, screen resolution, page layout
  • Target audience, browser friendly techniques
  • Best practices for graphic and text design
  • Tables: headings, captions, attributes, rows, cells, design and layout
  • Forms: controls, tab index, access key, image buttons, buttons
  • Styling a form with CSS
  • Adding multimedia: audio, video, animation
  • Introduction to JavaScript
  • Introduction to JQuery
  • Working with variables, operators, and expressions
  • Working with Arrays, Loops, and Conditional Statements
  • Introducing the Document Object Model
  • Working with the Event Model; Working with Windows and Frames
  • Validating Web Forms
  • Managing a website: database, analysis, design, testing, launch, maintenance
  • Responsive design
  • Domain name, registering, web-hosting
  • SEO techniques, search engine placement

DIG 2000C – Introduction to Digital Media

Course Description

This course introduces students to computer concepts and application software used for digital design and graphical communications. Students explore images, audio, video, web and graphical concepts and complete related projects. Additionally, the course incorporates a review of computer and communications technology and their influence on culture and media. Additional content includes digital concepts, file types, operating systems, computer hardware, software, productivity suites, spreadsheets, file management, data representation and Internet safety and browsing.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the role of digital media in modern society
  2. Discuss the influence of target audience on digital media production
  3. Identify deployment strategies for various types of digital media formats
  4. Describe design methodology from concept to production
  5. List and describe a variety of digital media for target genres of communication
  6. Summarize the process of digitization
  7. Demonstrate familiarity with computers, related concepts and technology
  8. Demonstrate familiarity with standard productivity suites and workflows
  9. Demonstrate familiarity with major operating systems, file types, software and hardware
  10. Demonstrate use of safe Internet browsing skills and techniques
  11. Describe the role of teamwork in digital media production
  12. Plan and implement a digital media project or creative activity

Course Content

  • History of Digital Media
  • Social function of Digital Media
  • Internet safety and use
  • Future of Digital Media
  • Understanding basic concepts of digital media
  • Understanding basic computer terminology and concepts
  • Digital media projects, personnel, and teamwork
  • Productivity suites
  • Operating systems
  • File types
  • Data storage and concepts
  • Editing digital images
  • Capturing and editing digital Audio
  • Capturing and editing digital Video
  • Interactivity, navigation, GUI, ease-of-use

DIG 2030C – Digital Video and Sound

Course Description

This course introduces the concepts, principles, tools, and techniques for telling visual stories and producing, assembling, and mixing digital video and audio. The course focuses on story conception, creativity, planning, and organizational skills as components of the production process. The course topics include story elements, screenplay and script-writing software, video personnel, budgets and scheduling, formats and terminologies, lighting, audio, safety precautions, messaging techniques, audience research, shot types, video software, hardware, tools and resources, DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras, video capture, editing, titling, post production techniques, output formats, and distribution.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the video production process and people involved
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the elements of a good story
  3. Create a short story/message or edit an existing story for video production
  4. Describe basic concepts of visual storytelling for different genres
  5. Evaluate the various software for screen writing
  6. Develop a script using appropriate format (A/V format)
  7. Construct a sample budget, schedule, list of personnel, and timeline
  8. Dramatize a simple scene based on an existing script
  9. Show familiarity with standard video related terms, concepts, and ideas
  10. Demonstrate understanding of the video creation equipment, hardware, and software
  11. Describe video formats, sizes, concepts, and related terminologies
  12. Demonstrate safe and appropriate use of audio & video equipment and accessories
  13. Demonstrate creative control of lighting, composition, and exposure
  14. Apply creative use of audio, balance, and audio tools and formats
  15. Describe various shot types, angles, and techniques for composition
  16. Describe various formats for video presentation and distribution
  17. Recommend video tools & techniques given a certain budget, genre, and audience
  18. Compose, capture, and edit digital video and audio according to recommended principles
  19. Apply principles of good editing to manipulate video, audio, images, titles and related media
  20. Create a digital video using appropriate techniques a clear message for a targeted audience
  21. Export finished video in a format appropriate for DVD, web, and mobile devices
  22. Create two or more finished videos for addition to portfolio

Course Content

  • Analysis and impact of memorable movies, ads, TV shows, web videos, or scenes
  • Preproduction, production process, postproduction, people, teams, budgets, timelines
  • Screenwriting, story development, visuals, scripts, storyboards, shot list, related software
  • Writing for an audience, writing with purpose, sharing responsibility, selling ideas
  • Video concepts, formats, terminology, transition to digital video, HD, codecs
  • Evaluating cameras, image quality, lens, features, types, interface, controls, accessories
  • Using video equipment, angles, depth of field, aspect ratio, framing, motion, zoom, aperture
  • Camera mounts, safety issues, movements, pan & zoom, white balance, gain
  • Audio concepts, microphone types, wireless microphones, environment
  • Sound control, sound recording, audio post production, sound effects
  • Lighting, types of lights, wattage, light quality, lighting people, video lighting, special lighting
  • Composition, headroom, framing, eye lines, lead room, dolly shots, handholding, exposure
  • Light safety, shadows, color, lighting techniques, light meters
  • Using DSLRs and other non-standard video capture devices
  • Editing equipment, workstation configuration, CPU, RAM, monitors, backups,
  • Video editing software and video capture/acquisition, linear editing principles, rendering
  • Drag and drop, cuts, ripple & roll, slip, slide, effects, titles, importing media, images, audio
  • Sound editing, audio fixes, cleaning, equalizer, vocal problems, sound effects, music, licenses
  • Color correction, luminance, chroma, fixing camera shakes, mixing different media
  • Mixing multimedia elements to create a visually appealing finished product
  • Compression options, exporting for web use, exporting video to various formats
  • Finishing and archiving; portfolio addition

DIG 2109C – Digital Imaging Fundamentals

Course Description

This course introduces the concepts and principles of digital imaging and the tools and techniques of image capture, creation, manipulation, and integration when working with still images. The curriculum provides a study of composition, layout, color theory, and image capture and output using industry-standard software.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe design elements, theories and principles
  2. Explain the design stage from conception to completion
  3. Acquire digital imagery from a variety of sources
  4. Distinguish between raster and vector-based graphics
  5. Use raster and vector-based graphics effectively to support a design project
  6. Use typography effectively to support a given message, mood, or theme
  7. Illustrate design processes, principles, and problem-solving techniques
  8. Apply color theory to create pleasing visuals using recommended techniques
  9. Demonstrate good use of visual aesthetics and design vocabulary
  10. Apply design principles to create a digital imagery project that incorporates good techniques for color, symmetry, space, layout, style, balance, and effective messaging
  11. Demonstrate appropriate use of file formats, image resolution, color models, file management, image optimization, storage, import and export settings for packaging and distribution

Course Content

  • Elements of design; Design principles
  • Design stages from concept to completion
  • Typography imagery
  • Saving graphic file formats
  • Understanding the importance of color
  • Creating a multi-color product ad
  • Changing product colors. Saving selections
  • Permanently using channels
  • Using quick mask for masking selections
  • Combining images using the paste into command
  • Working with brushes, symbols, and layers
  • Creating an electronic checkerboard game for e-mail
  • Changing colors of the board
  • Making digital illustrations from drawings
  • Selection and lasso tools
  • Creating a logo
  • Outlining the template image
  • Creating type on paths
  • Integrating Photoshop and illustrator files for web use
  • Selecting by color range, and using the masks panel
  • Combining illustrator and Photoshop graphics
  • Creating & editing finished images using appropriate techniques

GRA 2120C – Page Design and Layout

Course Description

This course provides a study of the placement of visual elements on a page and the manipulation of images, text, color, and other graphic elements to create a finished product that incorporates the principles of good design, layout, and aesthetics. Students use a systematic, cumulative, and conceptual design process to develop strong, creative layout solutions. Industry standard software for page layout and composition is used as students explore theories of design, spatial relationships, idea representation, page elements, and visual and concept communication. Students integrate photographs, illustrations, display elements, text type, and other elements to create brochures, advertisements, flyers, and other products for the printed and projected page. Adobe InDesign is used extensively.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use accurate industry terminology for page layout and composition
  2. Demonstrate intermediate understanding and usage of the main elements of a layout
  3. Exhibit knowledge of spatial relationships between elements in a layout
  4. Manipulate type, lines, images, color and other graphic elements using industry standard software to create
    effective page layouts
  5. Identify and apply accepted design standards for effective layout
  6. Craft and communicate an intended message using page layout software
  7. Prepare created or manipulated artwork for various printing, reproduction, and output processes and formats
  8. Demonstrate understanding of the critical elements for good mechanical reproduction
  9. Exhibit intermediate technical skills in the use of tools for board layout and mechanical reproduction.
  10. Utilize art and photography in the preparation of sizing and scaling

Course Content

  • Systematic process to design, brainstorming, conceptualization
  • Research, experimentation, creativity, thumbnail sketches
  • Communicating through graphic design, visual culture, visual storytelling
  • Design fundamentals and intuition
  • Grid systems in graphic design
  • Composition, layouts, margins, columns, cut-lines, headlines, tags
  • Space, line, shape, size, pattern, texture, value, focal point, contrast, balance
  • Unity, perspectives, movement, rhythm, lighting
  • Order, organization, placement, multiple page layouts
  • Typography: font family, characteristics, selection, design, styling
  • Pictures and words
  • Colors: impact, culture, history, nature, color wheel, CMYK, RGB, rules
  • Visual appeal: file format, size, photo selection, editing, photo resources
  • Infographics, graphics packages
  • Storyboarding
  • Layout for web pages; simple graphics, multimedia web sites
  • Printing: planning, paper, types of printing, print cost estimates, print preparation
  • Signs of an amateur designer

DIG 2500C – Fundamentals of Interactive Design

Course Description

This course introduces students to a systematic approach to developing media and visual communication in an approachable, interactive manner. Students evaluate user-interface designs across platforms including web, video, graphic, print media, animated sequences, software applications, gaming platforms, and entertainment options to determine their effectiveness and usability. Human-computer interaction, optimization and performance issues, ease-of-use, content delivery, functionality, design principles, and resources and tools are also examined. Students combine audio, video, imaging, animation, and other media formats to construct an interactive product using industry standard software.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe various types of interface, interactivity, and input options
  2. Explain important concepts in interactive design
  3. Demonstrate good understanding of human interaction with computers
  4. Evaluate various interactive product designs and assess their effectiveness
  5. Assess a user’s needs and recommend an appropriate design approach
  6. Apply effective user-interface designs across platforms
  7. Write clear goals, objectives, instructions, feedback, and help information
  8. Deliver interactive content across multiple platforms
  9. Examine functionality, content and usability of a finished product for interactivity
  10. Create an interactive product that meets good standards of interactive design

Course Content

  • Types of interfaces; types of interactivity
  • Input types: point, select, direct manipulation
  • Human perception and impact on presentation of experiences
  • Human interaction with computers
  • Understanding a user’s needs to define a user’s experience; clients
  • Presentation of information: chunking, visual appeal, placement, colors
  • Information overload and anxiety
  • Writing good instructions: style, terminology, style guides, templates, tone
  • Screen design, screen control elements
  • Designing for platforms: web, intranet, software applications, print, mobile, handhelds, kiosks, TV, automotive, appliances, audible interfaces
  • Visual interface design: shape, size, orientation, simplicity, consistency
  • Navigation, windows, menus, toolbars, dialog boxes, pages
  • Feedback, guidance, errors, confirmation, alerts and help
  • Accessibility and internationalization
  • Designing for different audiences and needs
  • Illustrations, symbols, iconography, branding, identity
  • Layout, white space, negative and positive space, contrast, margins
  • Colors: meaning and use, color coding, color theory, color and perception
  • Typography, Graphics
  • Video: movement (pan, tilt, zoom), visual literacy, cuts & shot-types, storyboards
  • Usability testing, review, evaluation, and feedback

PGY 2801C – Digital Photography I

Course Description

This is an introductory class in digital photography. Using Adobe Photoshop, students integrate the principles of traditional photography with contemporary digital imaging. “Digital darkroom” techniques including scanning, photo restoration, and multiple imagery are explored to create imagery unattainable through traditional methods. Students are encouraged to create basic self-promotional and portfolio pieces. Adobe Lightroom is also introduced. A digital camera with adjustable functions is required.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic mechanical functions of the digital camera
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of how the mechanical functions of the digital camera relate to each of the creative functions of the digital camera
  3. Demonstrate techniques using shutter speeds to illustrate various “looks” of motion.
  4. Use a camera’s aperture to manipulate a subject’s impact using depth-of-field
  5. Describe the concept of white balance and demonstrate its use to illustrate how changing the color of light can affect the mood and relationships of photographs
  6. Describe relationships between a camera’s focal length and “f stops” and demonstrate how these attributes can be used effectively to meet specific needs of the photographer
  7. Explain the use of ISO and how it relates to each shooting situation and output quality
  8. Determine and calculate the final output size of a digital image based on the needs of each project and explain how those decisions can affect the quality of the final image
  9. Differentiate between the various types of file formats used in digital photography and how each one is utilized in relation to quality, size and special characteristics
  10. Explain the metering system on a digital camera and also how extreme lighting conditions (that will confuse the camera) can be manually adjusted to produce correct results.
  11. Identify the difference between a correct exposure and the “right” exposure
  12. Demonstrate how to capture, download, file and manage digital images
  13. Utilize Adobe Photoshop to complete assigned projects that will include the following skills (download and setup files for projects, use basic tools, size files, use layers, use edit and selection techniques, retouch images, manipulate type tools, and prepare files for final output to web, basic printing, or professional usage)
  14. Recognize basic concepts of photographic composition and good design layout

Course Content

  • Mechanical and creative functions of the Digital camera
  • Metering system of the digital camera
  • AWB and use of white balance
  • ISO and relationship to exposure and image quality
  • Using shutter speeds and apertures for regulating light and as creative tools
  • Basic camera metering system
  • Using file size and file type for professional results
  • Downloading images and filing systems
  • Learning the basic creative features of Adobe Photoshop to include: sizing images for specific needs, use of retouching, editing, type and adjustment tools for various projects
  • Introduction to composition and design layout concepts
  • Histograms to understand exposure levels and correction in camera and Photoshop
  • Metering with the 18% grey card utilizing window light to create a virtual studio

Additionally, from the eight courses above, you may substitute the following three Digital Media courses for any of the UCF recommended courses shown below:

DIGITAL MEDIA COURSES
  1. CGS 2820C Web Development Fundamentals
  2. GRA 2120C Page Layout and Design
  3. PGY 2801C Digital Photography I
UCF RECOMMENDED OPTIONS
  • ARH 1050 – Intro to Art History I (equivalent to UCF’s ARH 2050)
  • ARH 1051 – Intro Art History II (equivalent to UCF’s ARH 2051)
  • GRA 2156C – Digital Illustration (equivalent to UCF’s GRA 2101C)
  • ART 1201C – Design I (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2201C)
  • ART 1203C – Design II (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2203C)
  • ART 1300C – Drawing and Composition I (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2300C)
  • ART 1301C – Drawing and Composition II (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2301C)
  • ART 2330C – Figure Drawing I (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2301C)

AS Degree for Entry Level Jobs in Digital Media

A two-year AS degree in Digital Media prepares you for immediate employment upon graduation for entry-level media positions. Many students seeking jobs after graduation prefer this degree option. However, a growing number of jobs are requiring a bachelor’s degree (four-year degree) for entry and mid-level positions. So, if you have earned an AS degree or enrolled in the AS degree program but wish to transition to a four-year degree program, we have three options:

Option 1: Complete AA with Digital Media Electives

If you are in your first year as a student of Polk State and wish to transfer to a four-year institution after finishing your two-year degree, we recommend you enroll in the AA degree program (rather than an AS degree) and choose digital media courses for your eight (8) elective options (as recommended above). While it is possible to transfer the AS degree to a four-year university, the AA degree offers a streamlined approach.

Option 2: Transfer to UCF’s BAS Online Degree

If you wish to stay in the AS degree track (rather than the AA track) until graduation, you may transfer to a Bachelor of Applied Science degree offered by state institutions such as University of Central Florida (UCF). Polk State recently partnered with UCF to offer additional transfer options to students. For details, please review these links:

OPTION 3: CONVERT AS TO AA DEGREE THEN TRANSFER

You may also convert your AS degree into an AA degree by taking additional courses. This option, while practical, may not be the best use of your time or money.

However, getting an AA degree from a state accredited institution such as Polk State, streamlines your transfer to state universities in Florida. An added benefit is that state universities will accept your AA degree in full including all your courses.

Please note that it is also possible to transfer your AS degree to state universities, but the process is less streamlined and four-year universities such as USF, UCF or UF may choose to review your transcript to determine which courses will be accepted. So even though you are able to enroll in a four-year university with an AS degree, an AA degree offers a more streamlined path.

If you intend to transfer to a state university after completing an AS degree in Digital Media at Polk State, ensure you have:

  1. Maintained a 2.5 GPA or above
  2. Completed two college-level English composition courses with a “C” or better grade
  3. Completed two college-level Mathematics courses with a “C” or better grade
  4. Completed a foreign language course at the second level (such as Spanish II)

Select the appropriate link for more information about transfers to institutions such as UFUCF or USF.

Equivalent Courses

Recently, we received additional information from UCF about art and digital media courses offered by Polk State that are considered equivalents to courses  offered in UCF’s BA or BFA degrees in their School of Visual Arts & Design. These courses include:

  1. ARH 1050 – Intro to Art History I (equivalent to UCF’s ARH 2050)
  2. ARH 1051 – Intro Art History II (equivalent to UCF’s ARH 2051)
  3. GRA 2156C – Digital Illustration (equivalent to UCF’s GRA 2101C)
  4. ART 1201C – Design I (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2201C)
  5. ART 1203C – Design II (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2203C)
  6. ART 1300C – Drawing and Composition I (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2300C)
  7. ART 1301C – Drawing and Composition II (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2301C)
  8. ART 2330C – Figure Drawing I (equivalent to UCF’s ART 2301C)
  9. DIG 2000C – Introduction to Digital Media (equivalent to UCF’s DIG 2000C)
  10. DIG 2030C – Digital Video and Sound (equivalent to UCF’s DIG 2030C)
  11. DIG 2109C – Digital Imaging Fundamentals (equivalent to UCF’s DIG 2109C)
  12. DIG 2500C – Fundamentals of Interactive Design (equivalent to UCF’s DIG 2500C)

For more information, please contact Polk State’s advising or transfer departments for help. For questions about digital media, please contact Dr. Gregory Johnson.